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Sunshine on a plate

Sunshine on a plate


Summer is here – well, officially it started yesterday, but the weather does not seem to be taking much heed. It has been grey, cool and wet.

It might not be a perfect warm day out there, but I still feel all summery. I am not sure if it is the sunflowers smiling over at me from the table or the sunny plate of food I just enjoyed; a light quinoa salad studded with red beans and golden mango.

I made this dish for the first time a few nights back as part of a little “end-of-the-work-week-feast”. At first I was not convinced the mango would be necessary. So I started by mixing all the other ingredients together: some cooked quinoa, a small can of beans, chopped spring onion and a crisp citrus mustard dressing. I was already quite happy with the result. But it was only when I decided to add the mango that this dish turned into something special. All the flavours pair beautifully, but I think the real magic is in the contrast between the sweet melting mango and the little pops of earthy quinoa. 

The first sunflower - bringing warmth and happiness symbolizing adoration and long levity

The first sunflower – bringing warmth and happiness symbolizing adoration and long levity

 

Ingredients
(hardly altered from the blog ‘Taste Love and Nourish‘)
Serves 4

Salad
200g of red kidney beans (about 1/2 can)
1 ripe mango
1 spring onion
about 1-1 1/2 cups of cooked quinoa
2 tbsp dried cranberries or currants

Vinaigrette
juice of 1/2 lemon
juice of 1 lime
2 tbsp olive oil
1/2  – 1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp ground cumin

Topping
1 tbsp flat-leaf parsley
1 tbsp pumpkin seeds

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Recipe

  1. Rinse the beans well.
  2. Cut the mango into cubes.
  3. Slice the spring onion into thin rings.
  4. In a blow combine the quinoa with the beans, mango and spring onions.
  5. If using, cut the cranberries into smaller pieces (currants do not need to be cut). Add to the salad.
  6. In a small bowl combine all the dressing ingredients: lemon- and lime juice, oil, mustard, cumin, salt and pepper.
  7. Pour the dressing over the salad and carefully combine.
  8. If you have the time, keep in the fridge for 1 hour. Then allow to come to room temperature for 15 min. Salad is fine in the fridge for lunch or dinner the next day.
  9. Before serving. Chop the parsley and sprinkle over the salad together with the pumpkin seeds.

Tips & Variations

Consider some of the following

  • Use red instead of regular quinoa (used in the original recipe)
  • Use black beans instead of kidney beans (used in the original recipe)
  • Add frozen sweet corn kernels (used in the original recipe)
  • add avocado cubes or slices


Serve with

  • As part of a vegan dinner: spicy sweet potato, guacamole, green asparagus and strawberry salad with tortillas
  • Tandoori chicken drumsticks
  • Lambchops

More quinoa recipes

 

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One plate and two forks is all you need to enter chocolate heaven

One plate and two forks is all you need to enter chocolate heaven

Summer has been amazing with seemingly endless sweltering days. But ever so often this glorious weather is punctured by bland grey skies or a powerful rainstorm; Iittle reminders that this summer is not everlasting and that I better enjoy every single beautiful day.

So I have not been doing much cooking at all. On work nights I might throw together a quick dinner, but in the weekends I have been (literally) eating out as much as possible- I’ve been enjoying rooftop, waterside and pavement dining.

There have only been very few exceptions were I was tempted to invite friends over and cook a meal. And even then I did not want to spend long hours indoors preparing dinner. But then at the same time, when my friends are sitting at a table laughing and chatting, I want to be with them instead of standing in the kitchen putting together a meal. This dessert was exactly right:

this chocolate torte comes together quickly and can be made the night before – or earlier in the day.  After it has baked and cooled, you just pop it into the fridge until it is time for dessert.

This torte is decadent; it is so moist it almost has the consistency of a mousse. You can bake one large torte to serve a crowd or, for a romantic, informal dinner, you can make a smaller torte and serve it on a single plate with two little forks to share.  Either way, it is fabulous with a little whipped cream and a tart raspberry sauce or the way I prefer it: piled high with fresh summer fruits.

 

Pure, sensuous and rich decadence

Pure, sensuous and rich decadence

 Ingredients

(from the blog ‘Almacucina’)
Two small 16cm or one 22cm torte – serves 4 to12

110g (6 ounces) 70% dark chocolate
1 tbsp butter
30ml (1/8 cup) strong black coffee (brewed or instant)
3 large eggs, at room temperature
55 (1/4 cup) of (unrefined) sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract
120ml (1/2 cup) heavy whipping cream
a sprinkling of sugar

Recipe

  1. Line the bottom of two 16cm spring form pans (or one 22cm pan) with a circle of parchment paper.
  2. Preheat oven to 175C (350F)
  3. Au bain marie* melt the chocolate, butter and coffee, stirring once or twice. Once melted remove from the heat and allow to cool a little.
  4. Bring some water to the boil.
  5. Using an electric mixer whisk the eggs on high, gradually adding the sugar. Add the vanilla and continue to whisk until the eggs are pale and have double in volume – about 3 – 5 min.
  6. In a separate bowl whisk the cream until soft peaks form.
  7. Using a spatula fold the cream into the chocolate with a few quick strokes until incorporated.
  8. Then add the egg and fold in gently and quickly.
  9. Pour batter into the prepared form(s).
  10.  Fill a large pan or deep baking tray with the boiled water. Carefully place the cake pan(s) inside. The water should come about 3/4 way up the pan.
  11. Place in the oven for 25 min (maybe a little longer if using a large pan). The torte is done when it feels slightly bouncy but firm when you press lightly with your finger.
  12. Remove from the hot water bath and allow to cool 10-20 min.
  13. Cover and chill in the fridge for at least 4 hours or overnight.
  14. To unmold run a knife or spatula around the sides. If you find the bottom of the cake is sticking you can place the pan over a small flame to heat the base. Sprinkle the top of the cake with a little white sugar, to keep it from sticking when it is cut.
  15. If you are serving the torte in wedges use a hot wet knife to cut it, cleaning the knife after each cut.

 

* Au bain marie means melt in a heated water bath: bring a pot of water to the boil and then immerse a second pot/bowl until it sits about halfway inside the water. Keeping the water on a soft simmer allow the chocolate to melt.


Serve with

  • Fresh summer fruit (blueberries, raspberries, blackberries)
  • Whipped cream and a raspberry sauce

 

Summer bliss in a glass

Summer bliss in a glass

 

Enjoying the most wonderful summer heat wave – much too nice to stay indoors and blog regularly…..or cook for that matter….

Usually my idea of a prefect weekends involves pancakes for breakfast, but with this weather I hardly want to stand over a hot stove, endlessly flipping pancakes. Thankfully this fabulously summery dish crossed my path: some fruits stewed with orange and then layered with honey sweetened yoghurt and roasted oats.

The magic in this dish is the contrast of flavours and textures: tart fruit topped with gently sweet smooth yoghurt and crunchy oats.

The original recipe involved a few more steps (and calories): some cream whipped stiff with golden sugar that is folded into the yoghurt and finally some cookies crumbled over the top of it all. But I kept it a little simpler – as this treat is all about enjoying the summer.

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Ingredients
(a little altered from Albert Heijn ‘Jools Schotse Zondag‘)
Serves 2


250g mixed frozen summer fruits (blueberries, strawberries, raspberries etc)
1 twig of fresh rosemary
2-3 tbsp honey
1/2 an orange
optional: 1-2 tbsp butter
100g oats
100g Greek Yoghurt 0% fat
Recipe

  1. Place frozen fruit, rosemary and 1/2 tbsp of the honey in a little pan.
  2. Grate in the orange peel and stir in juice.
  3. Bring to the boil. After a few minutes, when the fruit is soft and has released some juice, use a slotted spoon to remove the fruit and allow it to cool.
  4. Discard the rosemary and allow the sauce to cook a little longer and thicken. Add to the fruit.
  5. In a separate pan melt the butter (if using) and add oats and 1 tbsp of honey. Cook stirring regularly until the oats have turned golden.
  6. Stir the remaining tbsp of honey into the yoghurt.
  7. Layer the glasses with fruit, yoghurt, oats (repeat layers). Finish with a little fruit and/or oats.

Tips & Variations

  • Whip 50g cream with some golden sugar until stiff and fold into the yoghurt
  • Add some crumbled cookies to the layers

 

...and now off to have summer adventures...

…and now off to have summer adventures…

Enjoying the good life with abandon but without any of the guilt.

Enjoying the good life with abandon but without any of the guilt.

I’ve really been slacking on posting vegetable recipes regularly. It has been ages since my last Veg of the Week post.  But this discovery is so fabulous it really deserves the special honour of being vegetable dish of the month. Actually this is my most exciting discovery this year.

Now I thought I would lure you in by describing this as a no-noodle lasagna. If I had been more forthcoming in my description, I am sure I would have scared you off. But now I have got you reading, I will reveal what the best replacement is for regular lasagna sheets. It is not zucchini (too moist), nor aubergine (too chewy) it is…. white cabbage.

Crazy I know! But believe me, it works!!

I will own up that I really do not like white cabbage. I am still haunted by childhood memories of limp, grey, funky smelling cabbage leaves wrapped around greasy, tasteless rice and mince. Couldn’t stand the stuff.

Never thought I would ever post a white cabbage recipe, but here I am raving about the stuff. Once you briefly blanch the leaves in boiling water and layer them with a Bolognese sauce and cheese, you have the most amazing carb-free lasagna. The cabbage leaves have a comforting bite that is similar to al dente pasta sheets; lightly chewy but soft at the same time.

You can stick to your regular recipe for traditional Bolognese sauce. Just make sure you meat sauce is on the dry side as the cabbage sheets will not soak up moisture as lasagna sheets do. For this dish I added plenty of mushrooms to bulk up the sauce with some extra fiber and minerals. As you are being unconventional already, I suggest you skip the effort of making a béchamel and give the below combination of ricotta, cottage and cream cheese a whirl. I really enjoyed both the texture and flavour it added to the dish.

The result is an amazing lasagna that has the same comfort as a regular lasagna but is just that little bit healthier. And like a regular lasagna I feel that this one tastes even better reheated the next day. So, make sure you make a double portion…. at least.

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Ingredients
(inspired by the blog ‘Simple Roots Wellness‘)
Serves 3-4

500g mushrooms
2 onions
2-3 garlic cloves
(300g-) 500g mince
1 can of peeled and chopped tomatoes
a pinch of chili flakes
1/2 tbsp honey
optional: a dash of Worcestershire sauce
salt, pepper
about 1/2 head of white cabbage (the outer leaves are a little handier then the ones closer to the core)
optional: 10g of chives
2 eggs
200g cottage cheese
100g ricotta cheese
100g (light) cream cheese
1 tsp mustard
100g cheese for grating

 

Recipe

Make the sauce

  1. Bring a very large pot of water to the boil (I use the largest pot I have.)
  2. Slice the mushrooms and fry them in a wide pot or large deep fry pan until just tender. Remove from the pan and set aside.
  3. Chop the onion and fry in the same pan.
  4. When the onions are translucent, mince the garlic and add it. Stir until fragrant.
  5. Add the mince meat and stir, breaking it up, until the meat has just coloured.
  6. Add the tinned tomato.
  7. Season the sauce with chili, honey, Worcestershire sauce, salt and pepper.
  8. Allow the sauce to simmer whilst preparing the rest of the dish. Stir once in a while and add a little water if it starts to get too dry. (When you assemble the lasagna the sauce should be quite thick as the cabbage leaves do not soak up liquid as regular lasagna sheets do.)

Prepare the cabbage

  1. Carefully peel the leaves off the head of cabbage. Cut out the thick ribs. You are looking for looking for the amount of leaves that will comfortably cover a teatowel when placed next to each other.
  2. Place the leaves into the boiling water until they turn opaque (about 2-3 min, but can vary depending on the amount of water). Using a slotted spoon remove the leaves and lay them on a kitchen towel to dry. Depending on the size of your pot you might have to do this in a few batches.

Make the sauce

  1. If using, chop the chives.
  2. Whisk together the two eggs.
  3. Add the ricotta, cottage and cream cheese and blend.
  4. Season with mustard, salt, pepper and add the chives.

Assemble the lasagna

  1. Heat the oven to 175C.
  2. Place 1/4 of the meat sauce in the bottom of a dish (about 20x35cm).
  3. Top with 1/3 of cabbage “noodles”.
  4. Add 1/4 meat sauce and 1/2 the cheese mix.
  5. Another layer using 1/3 of the “noodles”.
  6. 1/4 meat and the rest of the cheese mix.
  7. The rest of the “noodles”.
  8. The remainder of the meat.
  9. Bake in the oven for 20 min. The dish can be prepared until this step and then refrigerated to be finished another day.
  10. Grate the cheese and sprinkle on top.
  11. Bake for another 20 min.
  12. Allow to rest before 5-10 min before serving.

 


Serve with

  • A green salad made from lettuce leaves or green beans

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Some of the health benefits of cabbage

  • White cabbage are a Good source of vitamin C and folate and potassium
  • Cabbage is filled with antioxidant power. This enables our systems to fight free radicals and clear up toxins, including potential carcinogens.
  • The fiber in cabbage keeps your blood sugar levels from fluctuating and also regularizes bowel movements. Cabbage is anti – inflammatory vegetable
  • Eating cabbage may also reduce the risks of heart disease, stroke and cancer, specifically colon cancer.
  • It speeds healing of ulcers and improves digestive health.
  • Raw cabbage cleans the waste from the stomach and upper bowels which improves digestion and reduces constipation.
    (Source: tarladalal.com)

 

More recipes replacing carb with veg

 

 

ผัดไทย

ผัดไทย (Pad Thai) – bringing authentic Thai street food to your table – with a twist.

 

“Tick, tick, tick”-  that sound was my first encounter with Pad Thai.

It was a few lifetimes ago, on one of my first holidays outside Europe. I had been in the country only a few hours and was waking up from a jet lagged coma in a tiny Bangkok hotel room.

At first I wasn’t sure whether the “tick, tick, tick” belonged to the world of my dreams or this exotic foreign land. I lifted a dream heavy hand to pull back the curtains (not too hard to do, as the room was only a few centimetres wider than the bed). The world outside had changed whilst I had been napping:  night had fallen and the day’s desolate street had tuned into a bright and buzzing stage.

There was a crowd in a circle on the street below.  At the heart of all, there was a little aluminium cart. Blue flames licking a wok. A man industriously working a stir-fry.

“Tick, tick, tick” and moments later I was holding a little square plastic tub. At first I was a little disappointed, that all this anticipation delivered no more than a few noodles, some bits of chicken and a few diced veg. But then I used my flimsy chopsticks to slide a bite into my mouth; an amazing flavour explosion hit me: sweet first, followed by spicy- salty and then the lightest touch of sour.

I experimented for a while with different recipes to get as close as I could to the memory of that taste. This time I combined the traditional flavours of Pad Thai with one of my newer discoveries: zucchini noodles. I was amazed how well they worked in this dish. If you do not feel inclined to take a julienne cutter – even better a spiral cutter – to a zucchini, this recipe works just as well with the customary rice noodles.

A plate of Pad Thai always takes me down memory lane for a few moments. But then it mainly makes me smile at all those new discoveries and adventures that lie ahead.

Tamarind, fish sauce and brown sugar are a must, but the shrimp are optional

Tamarind, fish sauce and brown sugar are a must, but the shrimp are optional

 

Ingredients
Serves 2

1-2 zucchini (or rice noodles)
150g raw prawns
2 tbsp lime juice
2 tbsp fish sauce
1 tbsp tamarind sauce
1 tsp brown sugar
pinch of dried chilli
optional: 2 level tbsp dried shrimp
spring onion
coriander
1/2 red onion or 1 shallot
2 garlic cloves
1 red chilli
black pepper
100g bean sprouts
2 eggs
peanuts
1 lime

 

Recipe

  1. If making zucchini noodles: Use a spiral- or julienne cutter to cut the zucchini into noodles. When using a spiral cutter, break the strands about three times as they are too hard to eat when they are too long.
  2. If using rice noodles: bring water to the boil and prepare the noodles according to packet instruction.
  3. Peel and devein the prawns.
  4. In a small pan combine the lime juice, fish sauce and tamarind sauce and brown sugar. Heat gently to dissolve the sugar and taste – add more of any of the ingredients as you wish. Season with dried chilli to taste. Set aside.
  5. If using dried shrimp: Pour some of the boiling water on the shrimp. Allow to sit 10 minutes.
  6. Thinly slice the spring onion.
  7. Chop the coriander.
  8. Slice onion into very thin half moon slices.
  9. Deseed and chop the chilli.
  10. Fry onion, chilli, garlic on a high heat until just soft.
  11. Drain the dried pawns and add, keeping the heat high.
  12. Add the noodles to the hot pan. Heat until the zucchini wilts (You are looking for the texture of al dente pasta.)
  13. Add the sauce.
  14. Push the noodles to the side. Add the prawns and black pepper. Cook until the prawns are just pink.
  15. Toss in the bean sprouts. Move all to the side again.
  16. Add the eggs. Pierce the yolks and, when they start to set on the bottom, scramble. Stir vigorously until almost set and then mix into the noodles.
  17. Add half spring onion and coriander (and peanuts).
  18. Arrange on a serving plate and sprinkle with remaining spring onion and coriander (and peanuts).
  19. Cut the lime in the wedges and serve on the side.

Serve with

  •  this is a dish of its own right, but you can add
  •  steamed bok choy
  •  Thai fish cakes

 

Variations
Replace the prawns with a combination of chicken and tofu

Some of the health benefits
Click on the links to discover some of the health benefits of bean sprouts or zucchini

Where tasty meets healthy to have a party

Where tasty meets healthy to have a party

I always used to think that January was such a dreary month, but I am discovering that I actually quite like it: things slow down a bit and there is suddenly time to curl up on the couch and read a book or even just do some day dreaming.

The one thing I really do not like about January is that no one seems to be having any fun eating. It is all clear broths and leafy salads. Where does this idea come from that healthy food has to be boring, bordering on punishment?

I was shocked when I was watching this program on healthy eating a while back. This doctor actually declared that one of the main problems is, that food plays too big a role in our lives. He made an argument that food should not be at the center of parties and our time with friends and family. I think I actually gasped out loud!

My belief is that appreciating the simple, daily things in life is what brings happiness and joy. And we have to eat, which makes every meal an amazing opportunity to embrace and enjoy life. I say, spend more time cooking together and eating together. The real question is what you eat; if you use every single special occasion as an excuse to stuff yourself with food your body does not need, of course you will not live healthily. But if you look at every meal as a chance to enjoy beautiful food that nourishes, you will eat healthily AND have a smile on your face.

And just in case I have not made my point, here is a recipe to prove it – quinoa salad with kale, avocado and dried cranberries. This dish is a party of super foods on a plate with every single ingredient containing loads of nutrients that are essential for the body.

The first time I had this dish was when my friend LS invited me over for dinner as a sort of house warming (about a year after she moved into a place – but that just goes to show there is always a good excuse for a dinner party). But then she would have never knowing this dish if her sister had not prepared it for her a few months before.

Not convinced yet? Make this salad for someone you care for and you will be. Actually: even if you are convinced you should still make this salad 😉

A big thank you to LS and RS for passing this recipe on!

Finally a small note on the preparation:
As I am not a regular eater of kale I loved the fat that LS lightly stir-fried the kale to soften it a little. But if you prefer raw kale than you can “massage” it as RS does: tear the kale into small pieces and place in a bowl with some olive oil, lemon juice, a dash of salt and pepper. Then “massage” the kale with your fingers.

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Ingredients
(this recipe was discovered by RS who then passed it on to her sister and my friend LS who then cooked it for me. I had a guess at what the dressing might have been.)
4 servings as a side dish or lunch

400g (2 cups) of left-over cooked quinoa or about 150g  (2/3 cup) uncooked quinoa
olive oil
3 tbsp lemon juice (or 2 tbsp apple vinegar)
2 tbsp maple syrup (or honey)
1/2 tbsp balsamic vinegar
1/4 tsp salt
1/8 tsp pepper
1-2 bunches of kale, about 12 leaves (NL: boerenkool, DE: Gruenkohl)
15g almond slivers (or blanched almonds walnut halves or pumpkin seeds)
1-2 avocados
50g dried cranberries

Recipe

  1. If using uncooked quinoa: rinse the quinoa (this is important to remove the bitter taste). Cover with twice the amount of water. Bring to a simmer and then turn the heat low (I move my pot to the smallest flame and turn it as low as possible.) Cook for about 15 minutes or until just soft, allow to sit covered for another 5 min. Then spread on a large plate, drizzle with a little olive oil and allow to cool a little (in the fridge).
  2. Make a dressing from 2 tbsp olive oil, the lemon juice, maple syrup, salt and pepper.
  3. Toss the dressing with the quinoa. Taste; depending on the amount of quinoa you are using you might need more dressing.
  4. If the kale has thick stems you should tear the leaves off the stems. Cut the kale into thin short ribbons.
  5. Heat a large frying pan or wok and briefly stir-fry the kale until just wilted. (Alternatively “massage “the kale – see “Tips & Variations”).
  6. Spoon the kale on top of the quinoa and allow to cool a little. (The dish can be prepared ahead until here.)
  7. Briefly fry the almond slivers in a dry pan until golden. Allow to cool slightly.
  8. Cut the avocado into cubes.
  9. Toss the quinoa with half the avocado and the half cranberries.
  10. Place on your serving plate(s) and top with remaining avocado, the rest of the cranberries and the almonds.


Tips & Variations

  • Instead of stir-frying the kale you can massage it by placing it in a bowl with some olive oil, lemon juice, a dash of salt and pepper. Then “massage” the kale with your fingers.
  • Add a little feta or soft goats cheese

Some of the health benefits

Kale is being called “the new beef”, “the queen of greens” and “a nutritional powerhouse.” Here are ten great benefits of adding more kale to your diet:

  • Low in calorie, high in fiber and has zero fat. One cup of kale has only 36 calories, 5 grams of fiber and 0 grams of fat. It is great for aiding in digestion and elimination with its great fiber content. It’s also filled with so many nutrients, vitamins, folate and magnesium as well as those listed below.
  • High in iron. Per calorie, kale has more iron than beef. Iron is essential for good health, such as the formation of hemoglobin and enzymes, transporting oxygen to various parts of the body, cell growth, proper liver function and more.
  • High in Vitamin K. Eating a diet high in Vitamin K can help protect against various cancers. It is also necessary for a wide variety of bodily functions including normal bone health and the prevention of blood clotting. Also increased levels of vitamin K can help people suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Filled with powerful antioxidants. Antioxidants, such as carotenoids and flavonoids help protect against various cancers.
  • Great anti-inflammatory food. One cup of kale is filled with 10% of the RDA of omega-3 fatty acids, which help, fight against arthritis, asthma and autoimmune disorders.
  • Great for cardiovascular support. Eating more kale can help lower cholesterol levels.
  • High in Vitamin A.Vitamin A is great for your vision, your skin as well as helping to prevent lung and oral cavity cancers.
  • High in Vitamin C. This is very helpful for your immune system, your metabolism and your hydration.
  • High in calcium. Per calorie, kale has more calcium than milk, which aids in preventing bone loss, preventing osteoporosis and maintaining a healthy metabolism. Vitamin C is also helpful to maintain cartilage and joint flexibility
  • Great detox food. Kale is filled with fiber and sulfur, both great for detoxifying your body and keeping your liver healthy.

(Source: http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-4408/Top-10-Health-Benefits-of-Eating-Kale.html)

What's in a name? The Jerusalem Artichoke is actually a species of sunflower

What’s in a name? The Jerusalem Artichoke is actually a species of sunflower


Ever been taunted by a vegetable?

I tell you, the Jerusalem Artichokes in my local organic supermarket were provoking me every time I walked by. They would sit there looking all innocent, whilst making me painfully aware of the fact that I had no idea what they actually are or how to prepare them.

Last weekend I decided it was time to face the challenge of the Jerusalem Artichoke (Sunchoke, NL: Aarpeer, DE: Topinambur). I searched for some recipes and was surprised to discover that there really is no secret to preparing them. You can roast them, turn them into mash; they work as a side dish or as part of a salad. Then I stumbled across this simple recipe for a muffin size frittata. The original recipe is for mini muffins that are served up as finger food for a party. I decided to make my frittatas the size of regular muffins and have them as a side to my dinner of roast chicken drumsticks and green beans.

What a fabulous find!

These little frittata are quick and easy to throw together. At the same time they make even the simplest dinner look a little festive. They have a great texture: the Jerusalem Artichokes have a bit more crunch to them than potatoes; they pair beautifully with the silky egg. The flavour is almost a little smoky.

Any leftovers can be kept in the fridge for a few days and eaten at room temperature. Although they will collapse and look a little less pretty. Also they become a bit denser in texture. At the same time I cannot say I enjoyed them less the next day.

There is one thing I should tell you though: Jerusalem Artichokes have a reputation for causing flatulence. I do have to say that I did not really notice it with this recipe (as opposed to when I roasted them a few days later). I read somewhere that cooking them at a high temperature might make all the difference. So maybe the fact that these are boiled first makes a difference?!
The reason for the flatulence is that Jerusalem Artichokes contain inulin which is a carbohydrate that humans cannot digest. The task of breaking it down it is therefore sub-contracted to ‘friendly’ intestinal bacteria which do an admirable job of making the stored energy available but produce carbon dioxide as a by product. On the plus side inuline is a probiotic that is keeps your intestines clean and your belly flat. And on top of that, because the the body does not utilize this carbohydrate, the calorie intake is virtually nil, only 7 calories per 100 grams (although they contain about as many calories as potatoes).

Jerusalem Artichoke, Sunchoke, NL: Aarpeer, DE: Topinambur

Jerusalem Artichoke, Sunchoke, NL: Aarpeer, DE: Topinambur

Ingredients
(hardly altered from the blog “What’s Cooking Goodlooking“)
Serves 1 – about 4 muffins


about 150g Jerusalem Artichokes (Sunchokes, NL: Aarpeer, DE: Topinambur)
3 eggs
1/2 tsp fresh thyme
1 tbsp olive oil
1/4 – 1/2 tsp salt
black pepper
optional: a few chili flakes
5-10g fresh chives

Recipe

  1. Bring a small pot of water to the boil.
  2. Preheat oven to 180C (325F).
  3. Wash the Jerusalem Artichokes brushing off all the dirt (no need to peel).
  4. Cut out any black bits and then slice them into slices about the thickness of a matchstick.
  5. Cook the artichokes in for 8-10 minutes until just tender.
  6. Drain and set aside to cool a little.
  7. In a mixing bowl add eggs, thyme leaves, oil, salt, pepper, chili flakes (if using).
  8. Whisk briefly.
  9. (I have a silicone muffin tin so there is no need to grease it. If necessary grease your tin.)
  10. Chop the chives and add to the egg mix.
  11. Add the artichoke and stir to ensure all the slices are coated in egg.
  12. Spoon the mixture in 4-5 holes of your muffin tin. (The frittata will rise so about 1/2 to 3/4 full is enough.)
  13. Bake for about 20-25 min until risen and golden. Do not overcook them to avoid the egg from turning dry.
  14. Serve warm or at room temperature (they will collapse as they cool down.)
  15. They can be stored in the fridge for a few days (they will collapse and turn a little denser.)


Serve with

Some of the health benefits

  • Prebiotic effects Jerusalem artichokes contain plenty of inulin, which stimulates the growth of bifidobacteria. Naturally present in the large intestine, bifidobacteria fight harmful bacteria in the intestines, prevent constipation, and give the immune system a boost. Furthermore, evidence indicates that bifidobacteria help reduce intestinal concentrations of certain carcinogenic enzymes.
  • Packed with B vitamins, particularly thiamine, with a 100-gram portion (3.5 ounces) of raw Jerusalem artichokes providing 0.2 milligrams of thiamine. (about 13% of the recommended daily value). Thiamine, also known as vitamin B1, is crucial for the proper functioning of the nervous system and the muscles. It is also needed for carbohydrate metabolism as well as for the production of hydrochloric acid in the stomach. Lack of hydrochloric acid may impair protein digestion and cause stomach pain by inhibiting the activation of the enzyme pepsin. Furthermore, low acid levels in the stomach increase the risk of bacterial overgrowth in the stomach, which in turn may cause diarrhea or decreased absorption of health benefiting vitamins and minerals. The natural level of hydrochloric acid decreases as we age, and therefore especially older people might want to eat plenty of Jerusalem artichokes and other foods that promote the production of hydrochloric acid.
  • Medium GI food with a glycemic value of 50, Jerusalem, which means they do not cause rapid fluctuations in blood glucose levels. Due to their gentle effect on blood glucose levels, they can help curb cravings, prevent mood swings, fight fatigue, manage PCOS symptoms, improve diabetes control, and even reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke.
  • More potassium than bananas which are famous for their high potassium content: a 100-gram portion of raw Jerusalem artichokes delivers 429 milligrams of potassium, while bananas provide 358 milligrams. Potassium is particularly important for a healthy heart, properly functioning muscles and reduces your risk of developing osteoporosis. Potassium-containing foods are considered particularly beneficial for people who eat a lot of salty food.
    Source: http://www.healwithfood.org/health-benefits/jerusalem-artichokes.php#ixzz2qsIfVx6b